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Dog with Staph Infection

Hello,
I need a little help. Apparently my little labrador puppy (6 months) has a Staph infection and I would like to treat her homeopathically instead of giving her the antiobiotic the Vet prescribed. The symptoms are as followed:
- little pinkish (not red) pimples, size of a pinhead, which are encrusted in a white/yellow clear crust
- pimples started on belly as pussy pimples (acne-like) but then changed appearance as to the form outlined above
- pussy discharge from vagina
Thought of Cal Carb...does anyone have a better suggestion. Also, what would be the dose for an animal (8.5 kg)? Thank you for your help.
Cheers, Mim
 
  sydmi on 2006-02-01
This is just a forum. Assume posts are not from medical professionals.
Before giving Calc Carb, have you considered if your pup's mental match in some ways to the drug picture?

Also, how did you get your pup?

What are the stools and urine like (colour, odour, etc)? His diet, his thirst (whether he drinks much or very little water)? What things make her condition better or worse (like time, weather, temperature)? Any vaccination done? Also any other symptoms which you have not indicated. Any other symptoms may make a difference in the selection of remedy.
 
mersing last decade
Thanks for your reply. The mentals do not really fit,that's why I was hesitant giving her any remedy yet. She is not withdrawn at all. She seems a bit quieter than usual, doesnt bark as much, but seems active and sociable. She does not want to be alone. She likes being touched for a little while and then sits near me without seeking physical contact.
I got the dog from the pet shop. That's probably where she got the infection from, according to the Vet thats rather common?!
Stool: mid brown, softness normal, but offensive smell
Urine: light yellow, no noticable smell
Diet: Iams dried dog food, 3cups/day + chicken, doggy biscuits and fruit as treats
Thirst: not thirsty at all at beginning of infection, now very thirsty
Better for: cold, moist weather, being outside
Worse for: heat
Vaccinated: fully vaccinated & wormed
Other symptoms: very tired,sleeps a lot
Thanks again for trying to help my dog :-)
 
sydmi last decade
Mim,

I think your dog may constitutionally be a Phosphorus dog from your original description of him. Some say treat the whole animal and the skin and other problems will heal.

I have been searching for an answer for you for the Staph infection, but my research time on the computer is limited because of my living situation.

Here is what I found. Absolutely fantastic that you do not want to use medications to treat this, because those are suppressive therapies.

Here is an article on tea tree oil to treat staph infections. I know you can use essential oils, diluter or in lotion form on dogs. NOT CATS.

Colloidal silver applied topically may help as well.

There is also an enzyme site at nzymes dot com which someone claims to have cured their animal of staph.

Good luck to you!

NAMASTE

Tea Tree Oil: Natural Treatment for Serious Skin Infections

By Kimberly Beauchamp, ND

Healthnotes Newswire (May 27, 2004)—Tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) preparations may be as effective as drug therapy for the treatment of certain staph (Staphylococcus aureus) skin infections, reports the Journal of Hospital Infection (2004;56:283–6). At this time in which increasing antibiotic use is giving rise to more resistant strains of bacteria, identifying treatments for infection that don’t depend on antibiotics is an important finding.

Staph is a bacterium commonly found on the skin and in the nose of healthy people. Though it mostly causes only minor infections, occasionally staph causes more serious diseases, such as pneumonia. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a type of infection that does not respond to methicillin (Staphcillin™), the type of antibiotic used to treat most staph infections. MRSA infections are usually mild and limited to the skin and nose, but they may also lead to life-threatening blood or bone infections that are very difficult to treat. Most MRSA is spread by direct physical contact with infected people. Hospitalized people known to have MRSA infections are isolated to help prevent spreading the infection to others.

Tea tree oil has been used historically to treat both bacterial and fungal skin infections. A natural antiseptic, tea tree oil has the ability to kill many bacterial strains, including MRSA. The new study compared the use of tea tree oil preparations with drug treatments for MRSA skin infections. Two hundred twenty-four people took part in the study. The participants were randomly assigned to receive either (1) standard medical therapy appropriate for treating the infection or (2) tea tree oil. For nasal infections, the treatment was either mupirocin 2% nasal ointment or tea tree oil 10% cream, applied to the affected nostrils three times per day. For wounds and leg ulcers, the treatment was a daily application of either silver sulfadiazine 1% cream or tea tree oil 10% cream. For widespread areas of infection, the treatment was a daily application of either chlorhexidine gluconate 4% soap or tea tree oil 5% body wash. All treatments were continued for five days. To assess the presence of MRSA, participants’ infected areas were swabbed before the study, and again on days 2 and 14 after treatment began.

The drug therapies successfully treated 49% of MRSA infections; tea tree oil cleared 41% of MRSA infections. The difference between these success rates was not statistically significant, which suggests that the tea tree oil was as effective as the drug therapy. Mupirocin ointment was significantly more effective than tea tree oil at treating nasal infections, but the tea tree oil preparations worked better on other skin sites and ulcers than the drug treatments. The tea tree oil treatments were well tolerated, with no adverse effects reported.

Tea tree oil is a viable alternative to antibiotic treatment for MRSA skin infections. This finding is especially important as bacterial resistance continues to increase and infections become harder to treat. As of this writing, there have been no reports of MRSA resistance to tree tea oil.

Kimberly Beauchamp, ND, received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Rhode Island and her Doctorate of Naturopathic Medicine from Bastyr University in Kenmore, WA. She is a co-founder and practicing physician at South County Naturopaths, Inc., in Wakefield, RI. Dr. Beauchamp teaches holistic medicine classes and provides consultations focusing on detoxification and whole-foods nutrition.

Copyright © 2004 Healthnotes, Inc. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of the Healthnotes® content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Healthnotes, Inc. Healthnotes Newswire is for educational or informational purposes only, and is not intended to diagnose or provide treatment for any condition. If you have any concerns about your own health, you should always consult with a healthcare professional. Healthnotes, Inc. shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon. Healthnotes and the Healthnotes logo are registered trademarks of Healthnotes, Inc.

Back to top Newswire Index
 
Namaste27 last decade
"labrador puppy (6 months)"
QUESTION: is your pup an English bred lab or American bred Lab? English type are heavier, thicker and blockier while American bred are tall and lanky. Here again, it may make a difference in the remedies.

"Little pinkish (not red) pimples, size of a pinhead, which are encrusted in a white/yellow clear crust
- pimples started on belly as pussy pimples (acne-like) but then changed appearance as to the form outlined above
- pussy discharge from vagina"

QUESTION: Is your pup's skin dry and rough, worse by washing, or oil skin with copious perspiration? eruptions slow to heal? are eruptions scanty or appear in crops? Spread over the body or localised and/or in circumscribed spots?

What's the colour of the discharges? very offensive?

What's the colour of her tongue? Is it very dry and cracked? Alot of salivation?

"She is not withdrawn at all. She seems a bit quieter than usual, doesnt bark as much, but seems active and sociable. She does not want to be alone. She likes being touched for a little while and then sits near me without seeking physical contact."
Other symptoms: very tired,sleeps a lot

POSSIBLE REMEDIES: LYCO OR KALI GROUP OF REMEDIES

Namaste, I think Phos dog is better from catnaps. Mim's pup sleeps alot - may make a difference.

Diet: Iams dried dog food, 3cups/day + chicken, doggy biscuits and fruit as treats
Thirst: not thirsty at all at beginning of infection, now very thirsty

SUGGESTION: Take chicken off diet first and read up raw diet posted by Namaste. A great article by her.

Better for: cold, moist weather, being outside
Worse for: heat
Vaccinated: fully vaccinated & wormed

COMMENTS: The modalities are very much pointed to Syphilitic miasm, however there are exceptions. Other descriptions including mentals kind of fit the Psora miasm.
 
mersing last decade
In her original post on another forum, the description appeared to match that of Phosphorus.

NAMASTE
 
Namaste27 last decade
Hello everyone,
Can you all please consider the case described at http://abchomeopathy.com/forum2.php/264241/ and share your ideas and suggestions? It is urgent
[message edited by bhondor on Mon, 21 Feb 2011 06:32:25 CST]
 
bhondor 9 years ago

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